thankyoubasedgosh:

chroniclebooks:

"Creativity or talent, like electricity, is something I don’t understand but something I’m able to harness and use. While electricity remains a mystery, I know I can plug into it and light up a cathedral or a synagogue or an operating room and use it to help save a life. Or I can use it to electrocute someone. Like electricity, creativity makes no judgment. I can use it productively or destructively. The important thing is to use it. You can’t use up creativity. The more you use it, the more you have."

—Maya Angelou

via BrainPickings.org

What an incredible woman she was.

(via wearethefourthwave)

Librarians After Dark due date card illustration for today’s outgoing zine order.

tweed-eyes:

The Walking Library - London, England.

tweed-eyes:

The Walking Library - London, England.

(via lunapancake)

What I do with unruly patrons :)

What I do with unruly patrons :)

(via tigerhawk)

101 Crush-Worthy Librarians #45 Beverly Cleary

Beverly Cleary

 1916-

Crush-Worthy Qualities: Creator of the iconic Ramona Quimby, named a “Living Legend" by the Library of Congress

"Beverly Cleary was born in McMinnville, Oregon, and, until she was old enough to attend school, lived on a farm in Yamhill, a town so small it had no library. Her mother arranged with the State Library to have books sent to Yamhill and acted as librarian in a lodge room upstairs over a bank. There young Beverly learned to love books. However, when the family moved to Portland, Beverly soon found herself in the grammar school’s low reading circle, an experience that has given her sympathy for the problems of struggling readers." (BeverlyCleary.com)

Beverly Cleary attended the School of Librarianship at the University of Washington, Seattle, and specialized in working with children. She later became the children’s librarian in Yakima, Washington.



Book of the Week




Empty Mansions - Bill Dedman 

The first full length account of the life of copper mining heiress, Huguette Clark, and the ongoing mystery surrounding the reclusive eccentrics life and final will which left vast sums to her caretakers and to charity, while leaving her relatives out in the cold.

Library Due Date Card Art Samples from Librarians After Dark Zine Issue 1


old school

101 Crush-Worthy Librarians #89 Hugh C. Atkinson

 Hugh C. Atkinson

 1933-1986

Crush-Worthy Qualities: Non-ironic eye patch, innovator in library automation, named one of the 20th century’s 100 most important leaders in librarianship


"Hugh C. Atkinson arrives as university librarian in 1976. Facing a filing backlog of nearly a million catalog cards, Atkinson steers the Library into the world of automation. By 1978, the Library becomes the first major research library in the country to have an online catalog. Atkinson also fulfills his vision of a statewide, computer-linked library network. The network now includes than 2,400 libraries of all types, from public and grade-school to corporate and university, and is the most extensive in the country." (University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Chronological History of the Library)



Trivia: The Hugh C. Atkinson Memorial Award “honors the life and accomplishments of Hugh C. Atkinson by soliciting nominations and recognizing the outstanding accomplishments of an academic librarian who has worked in the areas of library automation or library management and has made contributions (including risk taking) toward the improvement of library services or to library development or research.”
jtotheizzoe:

Who would you most like to share a breath with?
Since shooting the latest episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart, “Whose Air Do We Share?”, I haven’t been able to escape those poetic feels that come with knowing we all really do share the same air. I mean, our atmosphere’s 1044 molecules of air is a lot, but given enough time we will share at least a few of those with everyone, living or dead. That’s pretty awesome.
Not only does it give me a wonderful sense of connection with people I’ll never get to meet, but it reminds me that we have to be careful about what we’re putting in the air up there.
My answer is pretty obvious (just look at the GIF above), but I want to hear from you all (it will make sense after you watch the video at the link, of course): Living or dead, science-y or not, famous or anonymous, whose air are you most excited to share?

jtotheizzoe:

Who would you most like to share a breath with?

Since shooting the latest episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart, “Whose Air Do We Share?”, I haven’t been able to escape those poetic feels that come with knowing we all really do share the same air. I mean, our atmosphere’s 1044 molecules of air is a lot, but given enough time we will share at least a few of those with everyone, living or dead. That’s pretty awesome.

Not only does it give me a wonderful sense of connection with people I’ll never get to meet, but it reminds me that we have to be careful about what we’re putting in the air up there.

My answer is pretty obvious (just look at the GIF above), but I want to hear from you all (it will make sense after you watch the video at the link, of course): Living or dead, science-y or not, famous or anonymous, whose air are you most excited to share?